Employees Don’t Read Announcements

In 2021, email is still the most commonly used channel for internal communications. This is out of step with the consumer world, where short-form and microcontent win out.

68% – the average email open rate for internal comms

8% – average click rate

56% – the average number of readers who read for LESS than 9 seconds. 

45% – the average number of readers who read for LESS than 3 seconds.

These numbers are from ContactMonkey’s excellent Internal Email Benchmark Report 2021 (you can get a copy here)

Let’s play those numbers out. You are an organization of 10,000 people. That means:

  • only 6,800 open the email
  • 800 click on a link in the email
  • 5,600 read it for less than 9 seconds
  • an astonishing 4,500 “read” it for less than 3 seconds (our air quotes added)

Almost half of your employees don’t read your announcements! Given 60% of an internal communications team is spent drafting, editing, editing some more, and get approval to distribute an email, this is disheartening.

No wonder 68% of internal communicators struggle with low employee engagement, responsiveness, and feedback. I’d imagine this makes it hard for communications team members to be fully engaged in their job too.

Internal communications emails are out of step with the consumer world, where short-form and microcontent win out.

Short Form Audio gives you a different option, a new fun channel for employee announcements. Short for audio is not the solution to all of these problems. But sharing Soundbites is an answer to some of them. 

Why?

And the result of this? 

**Almost 100% of employees consume Soundbites under 1 minute long. ** This is the equivalent of a 200 word or so email. 

Schedule a meeting to learn how to have fun with announcements, and you can get started by sharing Soundbites without investing in another heavy platform.

For 15 years, James Tyer has designed and facilitated processes and enabled technologies that help change to happen successfully. James helps large communities of people work together and is the author of Social by Design. James helps design the facilitation process, build bridges between silos, and teach/coach new ways of working and collaborating.